Best episodes of “Seinfeld”: Festivus, the puffy shirt and many more

Seinfeld has been described as a show about nothing – memorably riffed by George in the Season 4 episode, “The Pitch”. However, anyone who has watched the classic ’90s sitcom knows that there was a lot going on.

Created by Jerry Seinfeld and Larry David, Seinfeld premiered on NBC in 1989 and spanned nine seasons and 180 episodes. The show starred Seinfeld, Julia Louis-Dreyfus, Jason Alexander and Michael Richards, as well as guest stars who would go on to become big stars in their own right (Bryan Cranston, Courtney Cox, Catherine Keener, Debra Messing, James Spader and Bob Odenkirk , to only cite a few).

In honor of Festivus – the make-up holiday on December 23 that has become an annual tradition for Seinfeld fans – we’ve decided to take a look at our favorite episodes. Taking into account the enduring cultural relevance, its impact on the art of sitcoms, and ultimately how funny the episode is, here are the 10 best of What to Watch: Seinfeld episodes, in order of broadcast date. You can watch the nine seasons of Seinfeld currently on Netflix.

“The Chinese Restaurant” (Season 2 Episode 11)

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The first season of Seinfeld was only five episodes. So even in the second season, Seinfeld was still trying to find his rhythm. The episode that made it was “The Chinese Restaurant”. The concept is so simple – Jerry, George and Elaine try to have dinner before seeing a movie, but it essentially turns into a sitcom version of Waiting for Godot. Elaine is hungry, George keeps trying to make a call, and the butler (played by James Hong) keeps telling them it will only take 5-10 minutes. Seinfeld did another great episode at One Place in Season 3, “The Parking Garage,” but “The Chinese Restaurant” was the show’s first really big episode and set the tone for what was to come.

“The Boyfriend Part I & II” (season 3, episodes 17 and 18)

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When a parody of something becomes as recognizable, or arguably more recognizable, than the thing it originally intended to parody, it speaks volumes about the first. This is what happens with the JFK-The “magic loogie” scene inspired by the two-part episode of season 3 “The Boyfriend”. Jerry iconically debunking Kramer and Newman’s spitting story, involving guest star and Mets legend Keith Hernandez, is funny no matter how many times you watch it or – for that matter, even if you’ve never seen it. JFK. “The Boyfriend” isn’t a joke pony though. The gag of Jerry and Keith’s budding friendship mirroring that of a romantic relationship is fantastic. Nor can we forget Vandelay Industries drummed by George and the iconic ending of the first of the two parts.

“The Competition” (season 4, episode 11)

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Every once in a while a TV show comes along that pushes the boundaries of what you can talk about on TV. SeinfeldThe time came when Jerry, George, Elaine and Kramer all tried to be, as they said (ahem), master of their domain. From Kramer’s quick exit to the temptations the other three face – most memorable is George going gaga over a silhouetted sponge bath from a neighboring patient as his mother (the ever-fantastic Estelle Harris) is lying on it. a hospital bed. The episode was so popular with fans that Larry David and his company felt it deserved a callback in the season finale.

“The Junior Mint” (season 4, episode 20)

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Sometimes you just have to take advantage of the sheer stupidity of a Seinfeld episode, and there are perhaps few better examples of it than “The Junior Mint”. The episode takes its title from the classic candy, which Kramer sort of sneaks into a viewing section of the operating room. When he offers one to Jerry, the two have a bit of a fight and the candy flies into the patient’s open cavity. Don’t worry, it miraculously saved his life because, as Kramer points out, “It’s chocolate, it’s peppermint. This is delicious. … They are very refreshing. Yet, perhaps even more stupidly, Jerry doesn’t remember the name of the woman he’s dating and tries to guess it by the vague hint she suddenly mentions about it rhyming with a part of the female body (Mulva still isn’t a good guess, Jerry). Seinfeld Season 4 was the series’ only win for Outstanding Comedy at the Emmys, and “The Junior Mint” is here for the best examples of the series in its prime.

“The Puffy Shirt” (season 5, episode 2)

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Seinfeld showed us examples of a close speaker and a high speaker in his run, but the best style of speech presented was probably the low speaker, if not only because he gave us the puffy shirt. When George and Elaine go out to dinner with Kramer’s new fashion designer girlfriend, Kramer leaves for a while and Jerry is unable to hear what the chatterbox is saying. Not wanting to sound rude, he nods in agreement. He soon learns that what he unwittingly accepted was to wear his puffy pirate-inspired shirt. Today’s show, leading to the iconic line of “But I don’t wanna be a pirate.” The puffy shirt is now in the Smithsonian. If this does not speak of the legacy of Seinfeld (and, in turn, this episode) I’m not quite sure what that does.

“The Marine Biologist” (season 5, episode 14)

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“The sea was angry that day my friends, like an old man trying to send soup back to a delicatessen.” It begins one of the greatest monologues in television history, as George recounts his incredible rescue from a stranded whale. How we got there involves Jerry trying to impress an old crush on George by saying he became a marine biologist and Kramer’s Misadventures while playing his game of golf. Until these last moments, “The Marine Biologist” is a good episode of Seinfeld, but, when George pulls out the golf ball and Kramer timidly asks if he’s a Titleist, it’s taken on iconic status. No less impressive is Jason Alexander recounting how the monologue was born recently on a podcast.

“The Opposite” (season 5, episode 22)

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At the end of the fifth season, Seinfeld had firmly established itself as one of the best sitcoms on TV, and audiences had a pretty good idea of ​​the characters and what we can expect to happen to them. This is what makes “The Opposite” so good. It takes George – someone who always tries to cover up his worst impulses so that it all ends up blowing up anyway – and sees him going against his nature and ultimately succeeding. That leads into his job for the Yankees, which would give us a lot of great jokes for the next two seasons. This is also wonderfully reflected by Elaine, who realizes at the end of the episode that after being fired, she is now the George of the group. Of course, this all lasts the course of the episode and everyone goes back to their old ways, but the half hour upset what audiences expected. Seinfeldthe main characters of.

“The Soup Nazi” (season 7, episode 6)

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You probably don’t know who flippant Larry Thomas is, but if I had to mention the Soup Nazi you know exactly who I’m talking about and there’s about a 90% chance you blurted out “No Soup For You!” Thomas played Yev Kassem, the demanding chef better known as Soup Nazi on the eponymous Seinfeld Season 7 episode. While there have always been some great supporting characters on Seinfeld, it’s an extremely rare event when one of those supporting characters overshadows the main quartet so dramatically. It’s not even easy to remember the other storylines in this episode (for some reason Elaine needed a new wardrobe while Jerry and his girlfriend for the episode called each other a boring pet). The Soup Nazi demanded perfection from his customers, but he delivered it as a character.

“The Yada Yada” (season 8, episode 19)

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After being broadcast widely in this episode of Seinfeld, the phrase “yada yada” has become commonly used in people’s conversations as a great way to skip boring or routine parts of a story. Of course, in this episode, it becomes an embarrassment for George when he thinks that the woman he sees used “yada yada” to omit an example of cheating. We also get a pair of funny repeat guest appearances from Bryan Cranston’s Tim Whatley and Debra Messing’s Beth Lukner, a long romantic Jerry chase, and an always reliable and fun dynamic between Kramer and Mickey. You need a lot of good things to have a good Seinfeld episode, yada, yada, yada, this is one of the best.

“The Strike” (Season 9, Episode 10)

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H&H Bagels’ Kramer’s strike may be the inspiration for the title of this Seinfeld Season 9 episode, but it will always be known as the Festivus episode. When Kramer learns of the vacation Frank Costanza has created, complete with a bare pole for decoration (he finds the garlands distracting), the spread of grievances, and ending with the traditional feats of strength, he is immediately intrigued and convinces Frank to organize. a festive dinner, much to George’s chagrin. While there are other fun subplots out there, especially George trying to create a fake charity so that he no longer gives Christmas presents to the office, it all comes down to Festivus.

Every mocking wish from “Happy Festivus” to George, hints at Festivus’ legendary start and final climax dinner as Frank starts off with the all-time classic line “I have a lot of problems with you folks!” is the Christmas present (or Festivus) that continues to give for Seinfeld Fans.


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