Business Highlights: Starbucks Union, McDonald’s Skewed Suit


___

Melania Trump announces NFT company

Former First Lady Melania Trump this week started a business selling non-fungible tokens that must be paid for with Solan cryptocurrency, currently valued at around $ 180 each. Trump said she would post NFTs “at regular intervals” on her website, with a portion of the proceeds going to foster children. The press release announcing the company did not specify what percentage of revenue or pr will be donated. Aaron Dorfman, chairman and CEO of the National Committee for Responsive Philanthropy, said when a company fails to disclose how much it is donating to a product or company, “That’s a huge red flag. “

___

Fearing the omicron variant, holiday revelers are slowing down the celebrations

Christmas revelers across Europe are keeping a low profile, and U.S. officials are stepping up calls for unvaccinated Americans to get vaccinated against the new omicron variant, which threatens to wipe out a second holiday season many hoped to bail out industries affected by the pandemic. Scotland and Wales on Friday pledged millions of pounds for businesses hit in Britain’s latest wave of infections, a move that put pressure on Prime Minister Boris Johnson’s government to he does the same in England. In the United States, President Joe Biden’s administration has resisted tightening restrictions, but also sketched dire scenarios for the unvaccinated in a plea for hesitant Americans to get vaccinated. “For the unvaccinated, you envision a winter of serious illness and death, for yourselves, your families and the hospitals that you could soon overwhelm,” White House coronavirus response coordinator Jeff said on Friday. Zients.

___

Union opposes results of two Starbucks unionization votes

The union vying to represent Starbucks workers opposes election results at two Buffalo-area stores. The union says the coffee retailer waged a “shock and fear” campaign to dissuade workers from voting to unionize. The complaints are made in the objections filed with the National Labor Relations Council on Thursday evening. Starbucks denies the charges. Employees at a Buffalo Starbucks voted in favor of a union last week, becoming the first in the United States to do so. But Workers United says the company’s bullying tactics affected other stores where the votes failed or were not immediately determined. The NLRB will decide whether to schedule a new election.

___

New England shrimp fishery to remain closed as waters warm

The New England commercial shrimp fishery will remain closed due to concerns about the health of the shellfish population amid warming ocean temperatures. Cold-water shrimp were once a winter delicacy in Maine and beyond, but the fishing industry has been closed since 2013. A board of directors of the State Marine Fisheries Regulatory Commission of the Atlantic voted Friday to keep the fishery closed for at least three more years. Shrimp prefer cold water, and the health of their populations is threatened by the warming ocean off New England. The Gulf of Maine, in particular, is warming faster than most of the world’s oceans.

___

‘Spider-Man: No Way Home’ wins $ 50 million in previews

For the first time since the start of the pandemic, the box office is booming. “Spider-Man: No Way Home” grossed $ 50 million in preview Thursday alone, a stellar start for a film set to break pandemic records. Sony Pictures’ “No Way Home” had the third-highest total of previews on record, behind those of “Avengers: Endgame” and “The Force Awakens”. Previews once featured only late-night screenings, but they have steadily evolved earlier in the day. “No Way Home” started playing around 3pm in 3,767 locations. But there was no exaggerating the mind-boggling total of Marvel’s release. “No Way Home” is set to be the first version of the pandemic to surpass $ 100 million. It could go up to $ 150 million.

___

McDonald’s to pay black store owner $ 33.5 million to end bias lawsuit

McDonald’s will pay a former baseball player who owns multiple franchises $ 33.5 million to end a lawsuit he has filed against the company accusing him of racial discrimination. Herb Washington, who is black, owned more than a dozen restaurants in Ohio and Pennsylvania when he filed a lawsuit in February, saying the company had treated white owners more favorably and denied him the opportunity to purchase. stores in wealthier communities. Cleveland.com reports that McDonald’s said in a statement Thursday that the amount it was paying Washington was “no more” than the fair value of the franchises it owned.

___

Regulators: threats to the US financial system remain high

The country’s main financial regulators told Congress on Friday that threats to financial stability remain high even as the country has recovered from the worst economic shocks resulting from the COVID pandemic. In its annual report on threats to the financial system, the Financial Stability Oversight Council ranked climate change as an emerging risk due to factors such as potential loan losses from floods and wildfires. It was the first time that the board’s annual report highlighted climate change as a risk to the financial system. This year’s report was the first released by the Biden administration, which has made tackling climate change a top priority, including referring to the Trump administration’s decision to pull the United States out of the country. Paris climate agreement.

___

Sears sells suburban Chicago headquarters

Sears plans to sell the sprawling suburban Chicago headquarters that has been the home of the struggling retailer for three decades. Sears parent company Transformco confirmed this week that in early 2022 it plans to market the 273-acre head office in the northwest suburb of Hoffman Estates. Transformco has been downsizing Sears operations and staff for several years. Sears was once the nation’s largest retailer, but has struggled in recent years, seeking Chapter 11 bankruptcy protection in 2018 with billions of dollars in debt. Transformco bought the retailer and 425 stores in a 2019 bankruptcy auction.

____

The S&P 500 lost 48.03 points, or 1%, to 4,620.64. The Dow Jones Industrial Average lost 532.20 points, or 1.5%, to 35,365.44. The Nasdaq lost 10.75 points, or 0.1%, to 15,169.68. The Russell 2000 Small Business Index rose 21.48 points, or 1%, to 2,173.93.


Comments are closed.